Wednesday, August 11, 2010


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Reader's feedback published on 07/08/2010
The Daily Star is pleased to provide a forum for debate on a range of subjects, from local cultural activities to international politics.
Dozens, sometimes even hundreds, of letters fall into the editor’s mailbox daily. In order to keep the letters timely, The Daily Star generally produces a special letters section. When the influx of letters is particularly large, extra space is made available accordingly.
If you would like to submit a letter for publication, please remember to include your full name (first and last) and address, including city. The Daily Star typically only publishes letters under 400 words, and these are subject to editing. The Daily Star will not acknowledge unsolicited submissions.

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The Daily Star
“IMF: Low oil prices could restrain GCC growth”
July 28, 2010

The history of the company we now call BP over the last hundred years has really traced the arc of global transnational capitalism. The Anglo-Persian Oil Company, guaranteed itself, or won the right to own, all of Iran’s oil.
So, nobody in Iran had any right to drill for oil or extract oil or sell oil.
Then, soon after that find was made, the British government decided to buy the company. So the Parliament passed a law and bought 51 percent of that company. And all during the 1920s and 1930s and 1940s, the entire standard of living that people in England enjoyed was supported by oil from Iran.
So that became a fundamental foundation of British life. And then, after World War II, when the winds of nationalism and Anti-colonialism were blowing throughout the developing world, Iranians developed this idea: we’ve got to take our oil back. It was Mosaddegh’s desire, supported by a unanimous vote of the democratically elected parliament of Iran, to nationalize what was then the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company. They carried out the nationalization.
The British and their partners in the United States fiercely resisted this. And when they were unable to prevent it from happening, they organized the overthrow of Mosaddegh in 1953. So that overthrow not only produced the end of the Mosaddegh government, but the end of democracy in Iran, and that set off all these other following consequences.

Ted Rudow III, MA
Menlo Park, California, United States

International Herald Tribune and The Daily Star are available every morning in: Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Egypt, Qatar, Kuwait, United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Oman

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